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November 26, 2013

cork floors

Tags: Home Improvement — 7:39 pm Comments (0)

L1020395

I installed some cork floors in our condo at Kirkwood this year (kitchen last year, living room and dining room this year). We bought the panels from Ecohome Improvement. The cork floors are manufactured by Qu-Cork (Carina) and it was a lot easier to install that I thought. Didn’t turn out too badly. Now we have to see how well they’ll last given the foot traffic of snowboard boots and ski boots.



October 4, 2013

evaluating solar panels

Tags: Home Improvement — 9:17 am Comments (0)

As much as we want a solar panel system for our house, they’re still not currently priced where it makes economic sense for us — solar panel systems are still too expensive for the amount of energy that we use. I’m hung up on solar because they’re really cool and it just feels like the right thing to do (invest in). But it’s really hard to justify given their current expense.

We received a quote a couple years ago for 16 175 Watt, BP solar panels which would generate 3,529 kWh a year or 294 kWh a month average. We fluctuate between 170 to 360 kWh but we usually stay under 300 kWh a month and average in the 240-250 kWh range for the year. Homes of our size are in the 400 to 600 kWh range so an average of 500 kWh.

On the finances side, we’re looking at $36 a month electricity bill or $440 for the year. The cost estimate for a 16 panel solar system was $20,000 which would go down to $14,000 after the state rebate and Federal tax credit.

I like 7 – 10 year break evens which would mean the cost of the solar panel system would have to be in the $3,000-$4,000 range which is in the range of installing an HVAC system or tankless hot water system so not far fetched that one day it’ll be this cheap to install. The $14,000 is about $10,000 more than we could financially justify. From a “save the earth” perspective, our efforts to continue to conserve energy (LED lights, insulation, programmable thermostat, efficient windows, efficient appliances) is still the better way to go.

It’s possible that we’ll increase our electricity usage and of course we’re at risk for electrical rate increases, but at this time solar panels still need to go down in price unless we make it a DIY project and buy and install solar panels ourselves. For $3,000, DIY would make sense. Given the interest in solar companies though, solar panel systems will get cheaper as more panels are available and made cheaper and more companies are available to install them.

Some links:



June 20, 2010

thermostat settings

Tags: Home Improvement — 9:32 am Comments (0)

For my reference:

Winter

  • 68 during day for heating
  • 60 at night for heating

Summer

  • 78 for cooling

Resources:

 



May 28, 2009

LED light bulbs

Tags: Home Improvement — 2:47 pm Comments (7)

LED light bulbs like the one above are cool.  The one we got is 2.5W and it’s equivalent to a 45W incandescent light bulb.  There are 7 led lights inside that power the thing.  LED lights should be what we all move to but the investments made in cfls (contains mercury, higher wattage) has everyone buying cfls first.  LED lights are already showing up in street lights and will also get more popular in car head lights.  They’re also great in flashlights.

We’re using one of the LED bulbs for the porch light, one over a vanity as a night light, and one other for my end table– so high use areas that need just enough light.  The lights are a bit expensive and the brighter ones even moreso.  But the ones we got should last a long, long time.  And at 2.5W, can’t really complain there.

The rest of the house we’re using 7W to 13W compact fluorescent bulbs.

We also need (and on the lookout for) 3-way LED or CFL bulbs for lamps.  The 3-way CFLs that are out now are way too big to fit in a lamp.

We’re figuring, in lieu of solar panels, we can reduce the amount of electricity we use by having efficient appliances and lighting, turning off our electrical equipment when not in use, and insulating the house.  Google has several more good energy saving tips.

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* I’m in a bit of a writer’s funk.  Maybe the WordCamp this Saturday will get me out of it.  I’ve got a few more posts on products in general and then the rest of the year will be focused on work related stuff with hopefully some updates on a bathroom remodel once we get started at the end of June.



March 2, 2009

IQAir air purifier

Tags: Home Improvement — 12:07 pm Comments (3)

My parents got one of these whole home IQAir air purifiers installed in their house.  I like IQAir’s room air purifiers too, e.g. the HealthPro Plus — looks like it’s won some awards and both the whole house and in-room purifiers are probably worth a look if you’ve got health issues.  I guess these are what they’ve been installing in homes for the Extreme Makeover Home Edition shows.

I like radiant heating systems the best (which we don’t have and don’t plan on doing for our house) because they’re the most efficient and provide the best type of heat, but it doesn’t help when it’s hot and you need an air conditioner.  For most people, forced air heating and cooling system is best and might as well check out the IQAir purifier while you’re at it.



February 12, 2009

energy check list

Tags: Home Improvement — 7:00 am Comments (0)

There are a couple of cool energy check lists to look at:

We had a $1200 energy bill last year, about 50/50 electric to gas.  Unfortunately this was an increase of 20% over last year, we increased our usage by 20% :-(  However, the average energy bill for a household in the US is $1900 – $2000 a year.

Our usage was about 4500 kwh and 415 therms in 2008 and going to use this as baseline going forward.

For PG&E customers, all this information is available online.

The goal is to decrease usage and costs by 20 – 25% next year and 50% in 5 years.

—–

Infrastructure things we had already done:

  • Energy star appliances (heater/air conditioner, dishwasher, refrigerator, washer/dryer) though our dryer is now electric versus gas
  • CFLs with most of our lighting except three way lamps, led under cabinet lighting, and “candle” type lights in the living room
  • Insulated floors
  • Double pane windows

Things to do:

  • Insulate attic and install attic fan
  • Research insulation for exterior walls
  • home energy audit
  • Continue evaluating use of solar panels and tankless water heating


January 11, 2009

Sunrise Specialty – clawfoot tubs

Our last major home improvement for our very simple 2 bedroom 1 bath home in Oakland is the bathroom.  When we bought the house, the bathroom and kitchen were new but done very cheaply.  We remodeled the kitchen last year, and we did landscaping the year before that.

We’re going stay in the same style and period for our bathroom remodel which is a bungaloid — a house kind of like a Crafstman style bungalow but not exactly.  We’re going to with a 54″ clawfoot tub from Sunrise Specialty in Oakland.  We’ll probably go with wainscotting, a basketweave tile floor, a Toto toilet, and we have to replace the sink, vanity, and window.  We may redo the drywall and add insulation.

Sunrise Specialty only sells to dealers and so we’ll probably get our tub and all the fittings from Acorn Kitchen and Bath in Oakland or Omega Salvage (super cool place) in Berkeley.  The tub will run a little over $2,000 new.  The fittings will run another $1,000.

We hope to start work in June and get everything done as soon as possible.



July 7, 2008

kitchen remodel update

Tags: Home Improvement — 10:58 am Comments (0)

Granite countertops and stainless steel appliances…Not exactly.  More like paper countertop and black appliances.

We got the backsplash installed this weekend.  It’s an Oceanside recycled glass tile (creme brulee).  We’re getting cork floors from WeCork installed later this month, we need to install some hardware on the cabinets, paint the refrigerator, update the lighting and maybe paint.  And then we’re all done.  Maybe, possibly.  Earlier this year I said we’d be done by end of March.  Oops.

Almost after (once we install the floors and cabinet hardware)

This is a Blue Star range with convection oven and 22,000 BTU burners upfront.  The hood is a Vent-A-Hood.  The countertop is Paperstone.  Our cabinets were in the house when we bought it.  It’s Timberlake from American Woodmark, the Tahoe Oak Honey via Home Depot.

Before



July 2, 2008

solar panel calculation – small home

Tags: Home Improvement — 1:43 am Comments (3)

Summary: Solar panels for a small home needs to get down to a $4,500 to $7,000 price point for it to make economic sense for home owners — a 7 to 10 year break even.  It may get to that price point eventually due to demand, decrease in prices of solar panels, improvements in technology (like solar roof shingles), group/community price breaks, and continued tax breaks and rebates.

Details: For 2 to 3kWh systems, current price point is estimated to be about $20,000 for installation.  With State rebates and Federal Income Tax credits totaling $5,000 to 6,000 you’re looking at $14,000 – $15,000 for the system.  You’re getting about 300 to 450 kWh a month.  If you are currently using 400 kWh a month, that’s about $50 a month or $600 a year.  This means your break even point is about 25 years.  This doesn’t include the home value appreciation due to your solar panel investment.

We average 325kWh a month, about $35/month.  Other info:

Borrego Solar seems like a good company.  I’ve seen Solar City around the area as well.



April 10, 2008

home repair/improvement resources – Oakland

Tags: Home Improvement — 10:15 am Comments (1)

People we’ve worked with and recommend.

Plumbing
Michael Stabile (day to day stuff)
510-472-0123

Pelican Plumbers (big stuff, copper pipe replacement, etc)
510-812-1996

Heating/Cooling and Plumbing
Harry Clark Plumbing (even bigger stuff)
510-444-1776

Electrical
Gerrard Electric
510-525-4687

Early Light Electric
510-655-5877

Locks
Reed Brothers Security

1-800-400-LOCK (more…)



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